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Day 5 of the Siege ... See MoreSee Less
Day 5 of the Siege ... See MoreSee Less
Granbury Wine Walk, April 23, 24, 25 - get your tickets now!We're back for 2021! Ticket sales will go live March 5th! We are limiting ticket sales to 1700 per day to allow for social distancing so get your tickets before they sell out!

Texas Craftsmen, Artists & Vendors sign up here: form.jotform.com/210528258592056
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Granbury Wine Walk, April 23, 24, 25 - get your tickets now!
Day 4 of the Siege! ... See MoreSee Less
Day 3 of 13 day Siege - Remember the Alamo ... See MoreSee Less
Day 2 of the Siege ...“To the People of Texas and All Americans in the World,” wrote William B. Travis on this day in 1836, “…I call on you in the name of Liberty, of patriotism & every thing dear to the American character, come to our aid.”

Travis was writing from the Alamo, then under siege by the Mexican army. One of the men fighting there, a young Black man known simply as Joe, was enslaved by Travis. Much of what history knows about the fall of the Alamo is due to Joe.

After the final battle and an interrogation, Gen. Santa Anna let Joe go to tell the story of how the Mexican army crushed the Texian defenders. Joe did tell the story—to the Texas cabinet. Accounts of the battle served to galvanize the Texas revolutionaries into action, as the battle cry rose over San Jacinto: “Remember the Alamo!”

Learn more about the revolution and what happened next in Texas Revolution 185th Anniversary: The Birthplace of the Republic of Texas, a digital history webinar on March 2 at 10 a.m. CST. Judge Ken Wise, host of the “ Wise About Texas” history podcast, will discuss and debate the birthplace of the Republic of Texas with educators from San Jacinto Battleground State Historic Site, San Felipe de Austin State Historic Site, Varner-Hogg Plantation State Historic Site, and Washington on the Brazos State Historic Site.

Register for free on Zoom: zoom.us/webinar/register/1216131605326/WN_ziDmd8U4SIOETe1KJS7A5A
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Day 2 of the Siege ...
More on Day 1 of the Siege! ... See MoreSee Less
It begins - DAY 1 of thirteen days of siege - the Alamo ... See MoreSee Less
Interesting Granbury History!

Hood County News Wednesday, February 10, 2021
The Bridge Street History Center was the brainchild of Georgia Nutt Ramay, plain and simple it was her idea.

Georgia was a client of mine. She was a very unique, sweet, thoughtful, witty, intelligent and just a genuinely interesting lady.

Some people might say her personality was a little “quirky,” and, in a good way, they would be right.

Anyone meeting Georgia for the first time would have found her to be very reserved. She was not outgoing and would have never dreamed of attracting attention to herself.

In fact, I would venture to say that even in her active years here in Granbury people actually knew her mother, Glenn Etta Nutt, better than they knew her. Oh yeah, by the way, she had an undergraduate degree from the University of Texas at Austin (she loved to do the hook ‘em horns in this Baylor graduate’s face) and a master’s degree from Southern Methodist University.

I can still remember the first time Georgia came into my office. She had several real estate-related issues she needed help resolving, and someone had suggested that she come see me.

Over a period of time, we resolved all of the initial issues.

Later, Glenn Etta passed away, and I helped Georgia settle her estate. In my dealings with Georgia, with the passage of time, it became apparent that we both shared an interest in history and particularly local history. We swapped books and stories.

Our meetings always followed the same pattern. We would discuss the legal issues at hand, and then the conversation would inevitably turn to history, usually Granbury and Hood County history (although she had a distinct fondness for Robert E Lee and loved to talk about him).

It seems that our conversations about local history always wound up at the same point. We would talk about the stories and characters we knew, and then we would bemoan the fact that people we both knew were dying and that as they did, their stories about Granbury and Hood County died with them.

Now, to understand the next step in this little story, you have to understand a few other things about Georgia. I have already said she was intelligent, but she was also very inquisitive, and she was a thinker.

Many times when we talked, particularly if it had been a while since our last visit, at some point in the conversation she would say: “You know I have been thinking about our last conversation;” and then with that lead in, she would proceed to tell me her thoughts on one of the issues we had last discussed.

Now, with that in mind, one day after one of our bemoaning conversations about the lost stories and people of Granbury and Hood County she said, “You know I think when I die I want to leave my house so that it can be used as a museum to tell the stories of the people of Granbury and Hood and Hood County.”

And that’s what she did. She gave her home at 421 E. Bridge St. to be used as a museum. Now, the Bridge Street History Center is not located in Georgia’s house today (and that’s another story for another time). It’s in the David Lee and Sudie Nutt home at 319 E. Bridge St.

Georgia’s home today houses the Doll Museum.

You should be asking at this point, why would Georgia be interested enough in Granbury and Hood County history to give her home for use as a museum. Well, to answer that question, you have to understand that Georgia’s great-grandfather, Harrison Jefferson (H.J.) Nutt, according to the family Bible, “arrived in Granbury, Tex. on Wed. Nov. 11, 1890.”

H.J. fought in the Civil War and was a sergeant in Co. B., 17th Tam. Inf. and was a part of General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia that surrendered to the Commander of the Union Army, General Ulysses Grant, on April 9, 1865, at Appomattox Court House, Virginia.

Georgia’s grandfather, Jefferson (Jeff) Newton Nutt, was 18 years old when he arrived in Granbury with his father H.J. in 1890.

Jeff later graduated from Baylor Commercial College in Waco and then went to work for his relatives, Jacob and Jesse Nutt, in their mercantile business on the square in Granbury.

In 1900, he went to work for First National Bank of Granbury and served as cashier and then vice president of the bank until his death in 1932.

Georgia’s father, Jefferson Newton (J. Newton) Nutt, Jr. and her mother, Glenn Etta Nutt, were both 1928 graduates of Granbury High School. J. Newton was very involved in the insurance business in Texas and even served, for a while, as the insurance commissioner for the State of Texas.

After J. Newton died in 1968, Georgia retired from teaching in the Dallas Independent School District. She and her mother moved to Granbury and eventually purchased and restored the Nutt family home at 421 E. Bridge St.

Now, there it is, the CliffsNotes version of the story of a very special lady who had a great love for Granbury and Hood County history and decided to do something about it.

mauricewalton408@gmail.com

MAURICE WALTON

Maurice Walton is a retired attorney, a longtime Granbury resident, and president of the Bridge Street History Center.

HOOD COUNTY NEWS
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Interesting Granbury History! 

Hood County News Wednesday, February 10, 2021
The Bridge Street History Center was the brainchild of Georgia Nutt Ramay, plain and simple it was her idea.

Georgia was a client of mine. She was a very unique, sweet, thoughtful, witty, intelligent and just a genuinely interesting lady.

Some people might say her personality was a little “quirky,” and, in a good way, they would be right.

Anyone meeting Georgia for the first time would have found her to be very reserved. She was not outgoing and would have never dreamed of attracting attention to herself.

In fact, I would venture to say that even in her active years here in Granbury people actually knew her mother, Glenn Etta Nutt, better than they knew her. Oh yeah, by the way, she had an undergraduate degree from the University of Texas at Austin (she loved to do the hook ‘em horns in this Baylor graduate’s face) and a master’s degree from Southern Methodist University.

I can still remember the first time Georgia came into my office. She had several real estate-related issues she needed help resolving, and someone had suggested that she come see me.

Over a period of time, we resolved all of the initial issues.

Later, Glenn Etta passed away, and I helped Georgia settle her estate. In my dealings with Georgia, with the passage of time, it became apparent that we both shared an interest in history and particularly local history. We swapped books and stories.

Our meetings always followed the same pattern. We would discuss the legal issues at hand, and then the conversation would inevitably turn to history, usually Granbury and Hood County history (although she had a distinct fondness for Robert E Lee and loved to talk about him).

It seems that our conversations about local history always wound up at the same point. We would talk about the stories and characters we knew, and then we would bemoan the fact that people we both knew were dying and that as they did, their stories about Granbury and Hood County died with them.

Now, to understand the next step in this little story, you have to understand a few other things about Georgia. I have already said she was intelligent, but she was also very inquisitive, and she was a thinker.

Many times when we talked, particularly if it had been a while since our last visit, at some point in the conversation she would say: “You know I have been thinking about our last conversation;” and then with that lead in, she would proceed to tell me her thoughts on one of the issues we had last discussed.

Now, with that in mind, one day after one of our bemoaning conversations about the lost stories and people of Granbury and Hood County she said, “You know I think when I die I want to leave my house so that it can be used as a museum to tell the stories of the people of Granbury and Hood and Hood County.”

And that’s what she did. She gave her home at 421 E. Bridge St. to be used as a museum. Now, the Bridge Street History Center is not located in Georgia’s house today (and that’s another story for another time). It’s in the David Lee and Sudie Nutt home at 319 E. Bridge St.

Georgia’s home today houses the Doll Museum.

You should be asking at this point, why would Georgia be interested enough in Granbury and Hood County history to give her home for use as a museum. Well, to answer that question, you have to understand that Georgia’s great-grandfather, Harrison Jefferson (H.J.) Nutt, according to the family Bible, “arrived in Granbury, Tex. on Wed. Nov. 11, 1890.”

H.J. fought in the Civil War and was a sergeant in Co. B., 17th Tam. Inf. and was a part of General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia that surrendered to the Commander of the Union Army, General Ulysses Grant, on April 9, 1865, at Appomattox Court House, Virginia.

Georgia’s grandfather, Jefferson (Jeff) Newton Nutt, was 18 years old when he arrived in Granbury with his father H.J. in 1890.

Jeff later graduated from Baylor Commercial College in Waco and then went to work for his relatives, Jacob and Jesse Nutt, in their mercantile business on the square in Granbury.

In 1900, he went to work for First National Bank of Granbury and served as cashier and then vice president of the bank until his death in 1932.

Georgia’s father, Jefferson Newton (J. Newton) Nutt, Jr. and her mother, Glenn Etta Nutt, were both 1928 graduates of Granbury High School. J. Newton was very involved in the insurance business in Texas and even served, for a while, as the insurance commissioner for the State of Texas.

After J. Newton died in 1968, Georgia retired from teaching in the Dallas Independent School District. She and her mother moved to Granbury and eventually purchased and restored the Nutt family home at 421 E. Bridge St.

Now, there it is, the CliffsNotes version of the story of a very special lady who had a great love for Granbury and Hood County history and decided to do something about it.

mauricewalton408@gmail.com

MAURICE WALTON

Maurice Walton is a retired attorney, a longtime Granbury resident, and president of the Bridge Street History Center.

HOOD COUNTY NEWS
A great source to learn more about the story of Texas.It was called “Tejas,” an enormous Mexican territory. Soon, an epic story would be written across this terrain. Battles would be fought and legends would be born. Unspeakable tragedy—and a final, shocking victory.

Join the Texas Historical Commission for Texas Revolution 185th Anniversary: The Birthplace of the Republic of Texas, a digital history webinar on March 2 at 10 a.m. CST. Judge Ken Wise, host of the “Wise About Texas" history podcast, will discuss and debate the birthplace of the Republic of Texas with educators from San Jacinto Battleground State Historic Site, San Felipe de Austin State Historic Site, Varner-Hogg Plantation State Historic Site, and Washington on the Brazos State Historic Site.

Learn about where history was made; explore the birthplaces of culture, government, and the military of the Republic of Texas; and experience the epic story of the Texas Revolution.

Register for free on Zoom: zoom.us/webinar/register/1216131605326/WN_ziDmd8U4SIOETe1KJS7A5A
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A great source to learn more about the story of Texas.
A story of the namesake of our neighboring County seat, Cleburne, Texas. ... See MoreSee Less
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