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Where Gen Granbury died ... ... See MoreSee Less

Where Gen Granbury died ...Image attachment

An interesting observation by Shelby Foote ... it also created Hood County and Granbury ...

Shelby Dade Foote Jr. was an American writer, historian and journalist. Although he viewed himself primarily as a novelist, he is now best known for his The Civil War: A Narrative, a three-volume history of the American Civil War.
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An interesting observation by Shelby Foote ... it also created Hood County and Granbury ...

Shelby Dade Foote Jr. was an American writer, historian and journalist. Although he viewed himself primarily as a novelist, he is now best known for his The Civil War: A Narrative, a three-volume history of the American Civil War.

The Battle of Franklin - Gen John Bell Hood (Hood County, Texas) commanded the Confederate troops. Gen Hiram Granbury (Granbury, Texas) and Gen Patrick Cleburne (our adjoining County Seat, Cleburne, Texas) we’re both killed in this battle. The McGavock family’s Carnton Plantation location in the battle and aftermath is described below.When Hattie McGavock (pictured here, with her little brother Winder) was nine years old, her home was taken over and used as a Confederate field hospital during the Battle of Franklin. In a newspaper interview from 1931, Hattie said:

“I remember vividly that picture, those…brave generals lying there. I can still sense the odor of smoke and blood. I recall how the startled cattle came home from the pastures, how restless they became, sniffing and excitedly running about the place, bewildered by the smell of the battlefield.

I can still see swarms of soldiers coming with their dead comrades and lying them down by the hundreds under our spacious shade trees and all about the grounds. I shall carry those awful pictures in my mind down to the day of my death. I was only nine years old then, but it is all as vivid and as real as if it happened only yesterday.”

We believe that history matters. Help us continue sharing stories like Hattie’s by contributing during the Big Payback: boft.org/general-donations
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The Battle of Franklin - Gen John Bell Hood (Hood County, Texas) commanded the Confederate troops. Gen Hiram Granbury (Granbury, Texas) and Gen Patrick Cleburne (our adjoining County Seat, Cleburne, Texas) we’re both killed in this battle. The McGavock family’s Carnton Plantation location in the battle and aftermath is described below.

The Texas story of the iconic 6666 Ranch, one of the last, vast family-owned ranches. ... See MoreSee Less

The Texas story of the iconic 6666 Ranch, one of the last, vast family-owned ranches.Image attachmentImage attachment

The Texas story of Chinese Austinites who have added another contribution of diversity to the Texas quilt! ... See MoreSee Less

The Texas story of Chinese Austinites who have added another contribution of diversity to the Texas quilt!Image attachment

Timeline PhotosMay 1, 1718
Mission San Antonio de Valero was founded by Father Antonio de San Buenaventura y Olivares
Read more about the mission period on our blog: officialalamo.medium.com/the-alamos-origins-mission-san-antonio-de-valero-46bf1cb11bb
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September 1836, Ol’ San Jacinto was elected President of the new Republic of Texas. Houston received 5,119 votes; while Smith received 743, and Austin, 587. A straw poll at this presidential election concerning annexation to the United States showed approval of 3,277 to 91.
Houston then appointed Austin as Secretary of State and Smith as Secretary of the Treasury. Mirabeau B Lamar was elected Vice President. Thomas Jefferson Rusk became Secretary of War; James Pinckney Henderson would serve as attorney General, Rhoads Fisher was appointed Secretary of the Navy.
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San Jacinto Day - Battle of Flowers - Fiesta ... See MoreSee Less

San Jacinto Day - Battle of Flowers - FiestaImage attachment

April 21st ... San Jacinto DayThe battlefield of San Jacinto is the site of the final, shocking, and decisive conflict of the Texas Revolution that took place on April 21, 1836. Gen. Sam Houston and his army of nearly 950 Texian soldiers routed Gen. Santa Anna’s force of more than 1,200—in just 18 minutes.

Screened by trees and rising ground, Houston's men formed with Edward Burleson’s regiment at center, Sidney Sherman’s on the left wing, artillery under George W. Hockley on Burleson’s right, and the infantry under Henry Millard on the right of the artillery.

Under Mirabeau B. Lamar, the cavalry took the extreme right to cut off possible flight of Mexican troops. With their four-piece band playing a popular love song, “Will You Come to the Bower,” the Texians attacked at a run, crying, “Remember the Alamo! Remember Goliad!”

Such was their fury that 630 of the enemy were killed and 730 captured. An enemy shot shattered Gen. Houston’s ankle, but he lost only nine men (killed or mortally wounded).

Our San Jacinto Battleground State Historic Site in La Porte, outside Houston, is a 1,200-acre National Historic Landmark. Visitors can walk in the soldiers’ footsteps, explore the San Jacinto Museum, and ride the elevator to the top of the towering monument to take in a bird’s-eye view of where Texas’ independence was won.
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April 21st ... San Jacinto Day