Local Tales By Local Folks Event – A Special Sense of Place with Mary Saltarelli

A Special Sense of Place

Saturday, August 21, 2 p.m., Langdon Center Concert Hall

“Seating is limited so get your ticket early!”

Come hear about the people, their cultural backgrounds, and the historic events that shaped Granbury, Texas and infused it with the charm that we all love and cherish.

Just like the Hill Country and San Antonio, Granbury still reflects the heritage of its pioneer settlers. Learn about the men and women and the opportunities they sought and many found when they, like David Crockett, told their friends, “I’m goin’ to Texas,” and they settled in Granbury.

Discover more about the pristine Hood County Courthouse Square and its shining late-19th and early 20th- century buildings and how they reflect the backgrounds of the builders, the physical surroundings of Granbury, and the events that led to their creation. Local historian Mary Saltarelli will share fascinating facts that will make you see Granbury in a whole new light and appreciate it even more.

Drone video used with permission of Hue Drone

 

 

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🎉HAPPY BIRTHDAY GRANBURY!🎉
150 years of Texas history in the making!

JOIN US November 6 and 7, 2021 for a weekend of activities and entertainment to celebrate the Best Historic Small Town In America! 🇺🇸

Make lodging reservations at GranburyBandB.com before locations fill up!
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#granburybedandbreakfastassociation #granburybedandbreakfasts #granburybedandbreakfast #gabb #happybirthday #happybirthdaygranbury #granburysesquicentennial #sesquicentennial #birthday #celebrate #celebration #joinus #granbury #granburytx #granburysquare #granburytexas #texas #texasbedandbreakfast #bandb #bnb #staycation #vacation #getaway #roadtrip #travel #family #friends #visit #visitgranbury Granbury Chamber of Commerce The Granbury Square
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O’Neil Ford, a significant force in Texas architecture and preservationOne of Texas’ most famous architects left a lasting imprint on his hometown of Denton in addition to renowned work throughout the state.

O’Neil Ford was born in Pink Hill in 1905 and went to school in Sherman, where the heavily art-focused curriculum inspired not only him but his two siblings. Following the death of Ford’s father, the family moved to Denton.

Ford learned drafting, woodworking, and architectural drawing at North Texas State Teachers College (now University of North Texas) and earned an architectural certificate through correspondence school.

Ford designed municipal buildings, churches, libraries, and homes during his career. Collaborating with other craftspeople and artists (including his brother, a woodcarver), Ford integrated architectural designs with their natural settings. He was active in historic preservation and environmental causes.

One of his beloved works in Denton, pictured here, is the Little Chapel-in-the-Woods. It was built in 1939 on the campus of Texas State College for Women (now Texas Woman's University). Art students helped design and produce interior elements such as the stained-glass windows, mosaics, and pews.

Larger-scale projects by Ford and his partners included restoration of La Villita in San Antonio, several buildings for Texas Instruments, major portions of the campuses of Trinity University in San Antonio and Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, and the Tower of the Americas for San Antonio’s Hemisfair.

In 1960, Ford was named a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects, and in 1968 was appointed by President Lyndon Johnson to serve on the National Council for the Arts.

Ford died on July 20, 1982. His legacy lives on in the artistic blends of natural materials, clean lines, and open spaces of his designs.

📷: C.E. Carruth, from the collection of the Denton Public Library
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O’Neil Ford, a significant force in Texas architecture and preservation

Lampasas - Keystone Star Hotel - See how restoration and preservation energizes a community. ... See MoreSee Less

If you attended this month's "Local Tales By Local Folks" presentation you heard Cody Martin mention this short advertising film. Mobil Oil created this circa 1955-56 on the The Mangold Toy Company in Granbury, TX. detailing how stick horses were manufactured and some history of the company along with the founders, R.P. "Bob" and Mattie Landers Mangold along with their son J.C. Mangold.
Please comment if you see your much younger self!
#localtalesbylocalfolks
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Comment on Facebook

Three members of The Bridge Street History Center board (Teresa Lee Sims, Jake Caraway and Cody Martin) are shown in this film toward the end when kids are running around a small tree on their stick horses. It's been a few years ago...

We want to thank everyone who was able to attend our first ever "Local Tales By Local Folks" event today at The Bridge Street History Center! We have some fantastic upcoming speakers lined up so we're excited about bringing our local history to life and look forward to seeing you soon. ... See MoreSee Less

We want to thank everyone who was able to attend our first ever Local Tales By Local Folks event today at The Bridge Street History Center!  We have some fantastic upcoming speakers lined up so were excited about bringing our local history to life and look forward to seeing you soon.

Comment on Facebook

Karin and I throughly enjoyed the informative get together today. Lookin forward to the next one!

So sorry I missed it.

Another post about Clara Driscoll, who saved the Alamo!One of the storied figures of historic preservation in Texas is Clara Driscoll.

Born in 1881, Driscoll was the descendant of early Irish colonists in Texas; both of her grandfathers fought in the revolution. Her father became wealthy through ranching, banking, and business in Corpus Christi, and she attended private schools in the U.S. and abroad. Her time in Europe instilled in Driscoll the importance of preserving historic structures for future generations.

When she returned to Texas as a young woman, Driscoll learned about a fight being waged over The Alamo: portions of the old Catholic mission and Texian fortress were in danger of being torn down.

By the turn of the 20th century, the State of Texas owned the Alamo chapel, but the site of the old convent belonged to a grocer. It served as a general store with a variety of additions to the original building. In 1903, the owner planned to sell the lot for construction of a hotel.

San Antonio preservationist Adina De Zavala convinced the grocer to give first buying options to her chapter of the Daughters of the Republic of Texas (DRT), but the cost was much larger than what the group could raise. Driscoll spent her own money to cover most of the asking price; she was later reimbursed by the state.

This act of philanthropy earned Driscoll the reputation of “savior of the Alamo”—a title she shared, not always amicably, with De Zavala.

Over the following decades, Driscoll remained active in historic preservation and civic engagement. She donated her Austin home, an Italianate villa called Laguna Gloria, to be an art museum; it is part of The Contemporary Austin.

Driscoll died on July 17, 1945 in Corpus Christi. Her body laid in state in the Alamo Chapel—one of only five people to receive such an honor over more than a century. She is buried in the Alamo Masonic Cemetery in San Antonio.

📷: Texas State Library and Archives Commission
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Another post about Clara Driscoll, who saved the Alamo!

Lady Bird Johnson, LBJ and Vice President Spiro Agnew watch the liftoff of Apollo 11 on July 16, 1969. 76 hours later, Neil Armstrong would be the first human to step out onto the moon. 52 years ago today. ... See MoreSee Less

An interesting post about mispronounced names of Texas towns!Here’s the road trip itinerary for our Mispronounced Texas Town & Cities Tour.

A. Colmesneil
B. Humble
C. Bleiblerville
D. Elgin
E. Manor
F. Manchaca
G. Buda
H. New Braunfels
I. Gruene
J. Boerne
K. Blanco
L. Burnet
M. Llano
N. Goldthwaite
O. Waxahachie
P. Waco
Q. Mexia
R. Palestine
S. Nacogdoches

We would love to go to all the mispronounced cities and towns in Texas this trip but we only have a few days. I’ve included a list of more cities and towns below, supplied by our followers, that we’ll have to add to another road trip or two or three. Didn’t realize there were so many! I’ve also included counties and even roads.

Poth
Uvalde
Leakey
Refugio
Amarillo
Marathon
Study Butte
Balmorhea
Miami
Iraan
New Berlin
Palacios
Bexar County
Bosque County
Anahuac
Kuykendahl Street
Pecos
McLean
Eustace
Quitaque
La Joya
Brazos
Seguin
Knippa
Bogata
Tow
Falfurrias
Edinburg
Lamesa
Kosse
Marquez - MarKay
Riviera
Nieces county
Hico
Bowie
Mabank
Montague County
Ozona
Christoval
Pontotac
Floydada
Killeen
Buna
Kountze
De Leon
Sachse
Schroeder
Cuero
Lometa
Mesquite
El Dorado
La Marque
Cibolo
Schertz
Kosciusko
Knippa
Quanah
Nieces County
Bowie
Mabank
Tivoli
Buchanan Dam
Pontotoc
Colorado City
Coyanosa
Chillicothe
Lometa
Ovilla
Joaquin

Are we missing any?
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An interesting post about mispronounced names of Texas towns!

The Historic Granbury Merchants Association is sponsoring another fun family festival. The Festival will run on Saturday, Sunday, and Monday on Labor Day Weekend and promises to be a great way to celebrate the end of summer and the kick-off to fall!

Street Vendors will be selling items and many of the shops around the Square will be running Labor Day sales. The shops will have extended hours Friday thru Monday.

Sidewalk Sales, Street Vendors, Live Music, Street Dance, Karaoke and Lighted Boat Parade.

The main event of the weekend is Sunday night with Granbury’s famous Lighted Boat Parade at 8 p.m. This is a fantastic event and always fun to watch. If you want to participate in the boat parade, meet up at Stumpy’s on the lake at 8 p.m.
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Sesquicentennial Celebration November 6th and 7th 2021! ... See MoreSee Less

The story of the French ship, La Belle ... See MoreSee Less

The story of the French ship, La BelleImage attachmentImage attachment

Come visit The Bridge Street History Center and spend a special weekend in Granbury!Escape the big city lights and come to the dark side! 🌗

Granbury, TX is less than an hour drive from Fort Worth, but is located out in the spacious countryside of this great state! Can’t see the stars from your concrete jungle? Stay at one of the unique bed and breakfasts here in Granbury, and you’ll discover a whole new world!

Visit GranburyBandB.com to choose from over 20 B&B destinations in and around the Granbury area!
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#granburybedandbreakfastassociation #granburybedandbreakfast #granburybedandbreakfasts #gabb #granbury #granburytx #granburysquare #lakegranbury #granburytexas #texas #texasbedandbreakfast #bedandbreakfast #bandb #bnb #staycation #vacation #roadtrip #travel #explore #visit #smalltown #visitgranbury
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Come visit The Bridge Street History Center and spend a special weekend in Granbury!
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