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We visit with Hugo Gomez regarding the locations of the Mt. Ebo Baptist Church and the Pleasant Grove Methodist Church on Granbury's North Side. Join us on October 15th to learn more about the African American churchs and school located here in the early 20th century. bshc.ticketleap.com/school/ ... See MoreSee Less

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Location of Pleasant Chapel Methodist Church.

The Pleasant Chapel CME Church appears on this February 1932 Sanborn map:

The Mt. Ebo Baptist Church was out of the range of all the Sanborn maps. However, based on the video and Mr. Gomez' description, I think I have located it and its schoolhouse (as well as Pleasant Chapel) on this 1961 topographic map. Buildings were marked with small black squares. Schools had flags above the squares, and churches had crosses. I circled the sites in fuchsia. Source for the map is here: texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth453395/

We want to thank the Hood County natives and newer arrivals to our community who attended the Local Tales By Local Folks Before The Lake event today. Stories flowed freely and a good time was had by all! We plan on doing more events of this type so follow us on Facebook to stay informed. Photo below is Bond Feed Store in the early 1970's, currently The Wagon Yard as viewed from Crockett Street. ... See MoreSee Less

We want to thank the Hood County natives and newer arrivals to our community who attended the Local Tales By Local Folks Before The Lake event today.  Stories flowed freely and a good time was had by all!  We plan on doing more events of this type so follow us on Facebook to stay informed.   Photo below is Bond Feed Store in the early 1970s, currently The Wagon Yard as viewed from Crockett Street.

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A great event and very well attended! “The more you learn, the more you find out what you don’t know”.

I loved it so much!! Thank you for gathering the “old timers” so we can learn and laugh! Can’t wait for the next one.

Thanks so much for doing this, the stories were wonderful

I wanted to attend but I waited too late and couldn’t get tickets, so hope there will be more.

Sorry I missed this. I wanted to attend but had a prior commitment. I'll be looking for another....

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We love the Wise About Texas Podcast and if you're interested in Texas History we highly recommend it!You can listen to Wise About Texas on YouTube at www.youtube.com/c/WiseAboutTexas ... See MoreSee Less

We love the Wise About Texas Podcast and if youre interested in Texas History we highly recommend it!

OTD, Sam Jacinto elected President of the Republic of Texas by a 79% landslide!!!!On this day in 1836, several months after his victory at San Jacinto, Sam Houston was elected president of the Republic of Texas. He defeated Stephen F. Austin and Henry Smith in a landslide, receiving over 79 percent of the vote.

Houston, a key figure in the battle for Texas independence, made his home in Huntsville in 1847. He sold his house, called Woodland Home, a decade later to pay campaign debts. The home is managed today by the Sam Houston Memorial Museum.

Houston was a complex figure with a larger-than-life story. As “Old Sam Jacinto,” hero of the Texas Revolution, he was beloved. He was the governor of Tennessee in the 1820s, served as a U.S. congressman from Tennessee, was a representative in the Texas Legislature, and was a U.S. senator prior to the Civil War.

His political career ended in March 1861 when Houston, then governor of Texas, refused to swear loyalty to the Confederate States of America and was therefore removed from office. Houston believed that secession would end in a Southern loss; he was concerned with keeping the United States together rather than with ending slavery, which he said was necessary to supply the South’s economy. After his death in 1863, 12 enslaved people were still included in an inventory of his property.

Houston is buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Huntsville, not far from his home.

📷: Portrait of Sam Houston in 1848, The Library of Congress
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OTD, Sam Jacinto elected President of the Republic of Texas by a 79% landslide!!!!

Rosie and the Daughters wish you a happy Labor Day! ... See MoreSee Less

Unfortunately, Texans are no strangers to a variety of natural disasters. Today marks the anniversary of the Bastrop County Complex Fire, the most destructive wildfire in state history and a devastating event in Central Texas.

An extreme summer drought, record high temperatures, and strong winds blowing in from a tropical storm in the Gulf combined to make Labor Day weekend 2011 a singularly dangerous one in Central Texas. On September 4, a fire began that would eventually burn almost 32,000 acres. Over its weeks-long duration, the fire destroyed around 1,700 homes and killed two people.

Bastrop State Park - Texas Parks and Wildlife was at the center of the fire’s damage. Along with its important natural resources—the Lost Pines ecosystem and habitat for the endangered Houston toad—the park has cultural resources as well. Buildings constructed by the Civilian Conservation Corps, Works Progress Administration, and National Youth Administration in the 1930s make the park a National Historic Landmark. Built of local materials in the “NPS Rustic” style promoted by the National Park Service, these structures reflect the expert craftsmanship taught to young men and World War I veterans during the Great Depression.

Catastrophically, about 90% of the park burned during the Bastrop County Complex Fire. Fortunately, however, the 1930s New Deal buildings were spared. Firefighters and park staff dug fire breaks around the perimeters of buildings, swept pine needles and other combustible matter from the roofs, and continued to hose down the roofs as fires blazed within sight of the cabins, refectory, and other historic structures.

After the fire was fully extinguished in October, recovery efforts included assessments of the historic buildings; testing the sandstone and mortar for structural change caused by extreme heat and effects of fire-retardant chemicals; and combatting the impacts of erosion after so much vegetation was lost to the fire, particularly the iconic loblolly pines.

The THC presented our 2011 Governor’s Award for Historic Preservation to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Wildland Firefighting Teams, whose heroic work within the park was critical.
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Photos from Granbury Square Labor Day Weekend Festivities's post ... See MoreSee Less

Rock Hudson was ultimately cast in the role of protaganist Bick Benedict in the movie "Giant," which was filmed in Marfa, Texas, back in 1955, but every leading man in Hollywood ---- Clark Gable, Alan Ladd, William Holden, Errol Flynn ---- wanted to be Bick. Eventually, the decision came down to Rock Hudson and William Holden. Hudson's relative youth won out because the makeup artists were able to successfully make him look older but could not make Holden look younger in a way that was judged to be realistic.

So that's why Rock Hudson was Bick Benedict in "Giant.
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